Good Grazin’

I went for a run yesterday morning.. The roads leading out of my parents’ neighborhood terrify me so I drove over to Delcastle Park. Yes, I do feel ridiculous driving somewhere to go for a run. But I’d rather feel ridiculous than be run over by a car on some narrow, winding back road. I miss Brooklyn most when I run.

It was nice running in a park for a change. I was the only one running, but the walkers made for good company. As I ran, I couldn’t help but notice all the lush green grass.

 

20130805_0013What did I think of all this grass? How wasteful it was not to have animals out grazing it! Yep. That was my thought as I ran. I wondered how many sheep they could graze. It wouldn’t be terribly disruptive. They could do like Wyebrook does and move them to a new section every day. That way they aren’t free to bother picnickers or disrupt soccer games. They’d be a lot cheaper than a landscape crew, you’d save a ton on fertilizers, and at the summer you’d have meat!

20130805_0014Think I’m crazy? Paris doesn’t. They graze sheep in and around the city. San Francisco uses goats to control the brush around the airport. DC just installed a herd of goats at the Congressional Cemetery. If it’s good enough for Paris and DC, surely it is good enough for Delaware! Let’s get even more use out of our parks. They can still be a place for recreation, but why not allow them to contribute to the food system as well? Even better, donate the meat at the end of the season to the local food banks or use it for some kind of educational purpose in conjunction with local schools.

Check out all the benefits of grazing goats over at City Grazing’s page.

 

 

4 thoughts on “Good Grazin’

  1. Grazing sounds great for airports and cemeteries, but people play and have picnics in parks. The goats’ “fertilizer” might be a deterrent. Otherwise, I love everything about it! Economical, efficient, eco-friendly…

    • I do agree that parks could be tricky, especially small ones. But it could work for large state and national parks. They could rotate sections of the park from year to year. Close it off to the public and let animals graze for spring, summer and fall. Let it recover during winter and then open it up to the crowds the following spring and move the animals to a new section.

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